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HEALTH BENEFITS,NUTRITION AND RISKS OF WATERMELON

Despite the popular belief that watermelon is just water and sugar, watermelon is actually a nutrient dense food. It provides high levels of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants and just a small number of calories.

Watermelons have become synonymous with summer and picnics, and for good reason. Their refreshing quality and sweet taste help to combat the heat and provide a guilt-free, low maintenance dessert.

Along with cantaloupe and honeydew, watermelons are a member of the botanical family Cucurbitaceae. There are five common types of watermelon: seeded, seedless, mini (also known as personal), yellow, and orange.

Fast facts on watermelon:

  • The watermelon has been cultivated for thousands of years, with evidence stretching back to the Ancient Egyptians – who were expert cultivars.
  • Over 90 percent of a watermelon is water.
  • According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), China is the top producer, with 75 million produced in 2014.
  • Watermelon is thought to aid conditions including asthma, cancer, and inflammation.

Benefits

slice of watermelon with a knife

Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions.

Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant foods like watermelon decreases the risk of obesity and overall mortality, diabetes, and heart disease.

Other benefits of the watermelon include promoting a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, and overall lower weight.

Asthma prevention

The risks for developing asthma are lower in people who consume a high amount of certain nutrients. One of these nutrients is vitamin C, found in many fruits and vegetables, including watermelon.

Blood pressure

A study published by the American Journal of Hypertension found that watermelon extract supplementation improved the health of the circulatory system in obese middle-aged adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension.

Diets rich in lycopene – found in watermelon – may help protect against heart disease.

Cancer

As an excellent source of antioxidants, including vitamin C, watermelon can help combat the formation of free radicals known to cause cancer. Lycopene intake has been linked with a decreased risk of prostate cancer in several studies.

Digestion and regularity

Watermelon, because of its water and fiber content, helps to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive tract.

Hydration

Made up of 92 percent water and full of important electrolytes, watermelon is a great snack to have on hand during the hot summer months to prevent dehydration. It can also be frozen in slices for a tasty cold Popsicle-style snack.

Inflammation

Choline – found in watermelon – is a very important and versatile nutrient; it aids our bodies in sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory. Choline also helps to maintain the structure of cellular membranes, aids in the transmission of nerve impulses, assists in the absorption of fat, and reduces chronic inflammation.

Muscle soreness

Watermelon and watermelon juice have been shown to reduce muscle soreness and improve recovery time following exercise in athletes. Researchers believe this is likely due to the amino acid L-citrulline contained in watermelon.

Skin

Watermelon is great for the skin because it contains vitamin A, a nutrient required for sebum production, which keeps hair moisturized. Vitamin A is also necessary for the growth of all bodily tissues, including skin and hair.

Adequate intake of vitamin C is also needed for the building and maintenance of collagen, which provides structure to skin and hair. Additionally, watermelon contributes to overall hydration, which is vital for healthy looking skin and hair.

Nutrition

One cup of diced watermelon (152 grams) contains:

  • 43 calories
  • 0 grams of fat
  • 2 milligrams of sodium
  • 11 grams of carbohydrate (including 9 grams of sugar)
  • 1 gram of fiber

One cup of watermelon will provide the following percentage of daily vitamins:

  • 17 percent of vitamin A
  • 21 percent of vitamin C
  • 2 percent of iron
  • 1 percent of calcium

Watermelon also contains thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, choline, lycopene, and betaine. According to the National Watermelon Promotion Board, watermelon contains more lycopene than any other fruit or vegetable.

Risks

Moderate amounts of watermelon present no serious health risk. Excessive consumption can possibly elevate levels of certain vitamins in the body, which may cause complications.

Too much vitamin C, abundant in watermelon, can cause symptoms such as diarrhea or gastrointestinal discomfort. Foods containing lycopene, such as watermelon, may produce these symptoms too. These symptoms are only normally seen when excessive intake is from supplements, not food.

Potassium levels are another consideration, too much might lead to complications such as hyperkalemia which causes an abnormal heart rhythm and can be dangerous. Again, complications are most often due to excessive supplement intake. Overall, watermelon can be consumed safely with little risk.

Diet

Look for a watermelon that is firm, heavy, and symmetrical without soft spots or bruising. Tapping the outside can give you a clue as to the texture of the fruit inside. Listen for a light and almost hollow sounding thud; this indicates the water and fruit contained is intact and has a stable structure.

two glasses of watermelon smoothie

Watermelon can easily be incorporated into an existing diet, smoothies are a great way to get all the fiber and goodness in a refreshing drink.

Because watermelon is so versatile, it can easily be incorporated into a diet. Consider the following:

  • Roasted seeds – getting the watermelon seeds and roasting them in the oven for 15-20 minutes is a tasty snack that can be made in advance. Try adding just a little salt to taste.
  • Blended – place diced watermelon and a few ice cubes in a blender for a cold, refreshing electrolyte drink that is perfect for rehydrating after exercise or a day in the sun.
  • Salad – jazz up a boring salad by adding watermelon, mint, and fresh mozzarella to a bed of spinach leaves. Drizzle with balsamic dressing.

Smoothies are a good way to consume watermelon. Their high water content makes them not too thick and they can be ready to drink in seconds. Try to avoid juicing as this can pack a lot of sugar in a smaller volume, whilst removing the fiber.

Visit the National Watermelon Board’s recipe site for even more fun, inventive ideas on how to incorporate more watermelon into your diet.

About Dr Sundus Basharat

My name is Dr. Sundus Basharat, 25years old. I was graduated from Lahore College for Women University, my major is medicine. I live in Pakistan. I have ever worked in the community Health service center in Pakistan. Now I am working as a writer my motto is “write now what people need”. I spend most of my time in writing in a social network to gather people and give them interesting news and solution of most of our daily health and wealth problems.

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